Georgetown Hoyas spend the Summer in the Spotlight

CapelessGU Joe Maniaci of The Hoya recently wrote a feature on how the Georgetown Hoyas baseball team members Dan Capeless and Rand Ravnaas spent the summer. Both players led the Hoyas offense last season with Ravnaas leading the team with a .347 average with eleven homers and 35 RBI while Capeless had a .317 average with eight homers and 38 RBI.

Dan Capeless spent the summer in the Cape Cod Baseball League which is historically the best summer league in the country. He talked about his experience in the Cape League by saying:

“The [pitchers] threw everything in the mid-’90s with ungodly movement, It was cool because I got to put myself up against the best kids in the country and see where I was at. Playing with kids from different successful programs you get to see how things are done and what works on a national level. I was able to see what works and bring it back here.”

His teammate Rand Ravnaas spent the summer with the Alexandria Aces of the Cal Ripken League. Ravnaas had to make the adjustment to a new position as he moved from right field to center this summer. He talked about the adjustment saying:

“It gave me a whole lot more confidence,” Ravnaas said. “I was playing right field during the school season and now this summer I was playing center field. It may not sound like a huge difference, but it was great to get that experience in center field.”

Both players talked about the adjustment to wood bats with Ravnaas saying:

“It was my first wood bat league so it definitely took time to get used to. It took me two to three weeks to get used to it during games, getting used to the weight and balance of it, but after that it was the same as a metal bat but the balls don’t go as far.”

Capeless agreed with Ravnaas saying:

“It was definitely a big adjustment, more mentally than physically, because you can get away with a lot with a metal bat and you know that, so when you switch to the wood you feel like you need be perfect.”

You can check out the full article from The Hoya by clicking here.