Lee’s Davidson pitches second consecutive no-hitter

Mitch Davidson
Mitch Davidson

LHP Mitch Davidson has pitched a total of ten innings this season, and has two no-hitters to show for it.

On Feb. 14, the Flames defeated Virginia Intermont 12-0, in a game shortened to five innings by the mercy rule. Davidson went the distance, struck out four, walked two.

A senior from Chipley, FL via Wallace CC, Davidson was 6-0 for the Flames last year.

The Flames are now 8-0, and have outscored their opponents 73-12.

Story from Lee University site: Davidson Hurls Second Straight No-Hitter

  • http://thecollegebaseballblog.com Brian Foley

    Note: This was only a five inning no-hitter

  • http://tbirdbaseball.net/ Bob Broughton

    Davidson’s no-hitter a week ago was also only five innings. Same for the no-hitter pitched by Eddie Anderson of SCAD.

    SCAD has run their record to 10-1. They have three games with Embry-Riddle Feb. 20-21.

  • http://thecollegebaseballblog.com Brian Foley

    So should we be impressed with two five inning no-hitters? I know it is impressive and all.

    Bob, Why is there a mercy rule in NAIA after five innings? I would think it would be after seven.

  • http://tbirdbaseball.net/ Bob Broughton

    Here’s what it says in Wikipedia: “In NCAA and NAIA college baseball, the game will end if a team is ahead by at least 10 runs after seven innings in a scheduled 9-inning game, or five innings in a scheduled 7-inning game.”

    To answer your first comment, yes, ten hitless innings under pretty much any circumstances is an accomplishment, although Illinois Tech and Virginia Intermont are obviously not Fresno State. The Flames’ schedule gets a bit tougher in March, when they meet Trevecca Nazarene, Faulkner, and Southern Polytechnic.

    (Disclaimer: My mother went to Virginia Intermont, so I’m not allowed to say bad things about the place. However, when she was there, it was an all-women junior college.)

    • http://thecollegebaseballblog.com Brian Foley

      Bob, You know that many conferences do not have a mercy rule.