CCBL and MLB come to Agreement

The Cape Cod Baseball League and Major League Baseball have ended their season long squabble over the use of MLB logos with CCBL teams. We wrote a brief article on March 3rd abour the situation saying that MLB was demanding a 100k licensing fee. (Full Article available here) The biggest issue the Cape Cod League had with entering an agreement with MLB is that all merchandise had to be bought though MLB vendors. The full press release from the CCBL is available below.

The Cape Cod Baseball League (CCBL) and Major League Baseball Properties (MLBP) have come to an agreement that will allow the CCBL to continue using the trademarks of Major League Baseball teams.

Major League Clubs, which are required by law to protect their trademarks, own marks that are used as nicknames and/or logos for six of the 10 CCBL teams (Bourne Braves, Chatham A’s, Harwich Mariners, Hyannis Mets, Orleans Cardinals, and the Y-D Red Sox).

Consistent with other MLB agreements, the CCBL teams are required to use Major League Baseball Properties-licensed vendors to manufacture the team uniforms and other products in order to maintain trademark consistency and quality control, and to ensure MLBP does not breach its contracts with its licensees. Major League Baseball is a long-time supporter of the CCBL and provides an annual grant to the league.

“We are delighted to continue our affiliation with Major League Baseball that has lasted for more than 40 years for the good of collegiate summer baseball,” said CCBL President Judy Walden Scarafile. “We all worked diligently on this agreement and we feel it is workable and reasonable.”

“Major League Baseball Properties wants nothing more than for the Cape Cod Baseball League to extend the MLB brand by using Major League Club names and logos,” said MLB spokesperson Matt Bourne. “Our goal was just to make certain that our Clubs’ trademarks are used in a manner that is in compliance with applicable law and in a manner consistent with other agreements. This resolution assures that will take place.”

Thanks to Brian Foley for contributing to the report.